On the Convergence of K-means Clustering


On the Convergence of K-means Clustering – K-means is one of the fastest evolving data mining algorithms. It is an algorithm that is able to perform clustering and other computationally intensive experiments while being relatively efficient. This paper presents an experimental evaluation of K-means using synthetic and real data from KDDU. KDDU used a synthetic and real data set for training the algorithm to produce data samples and a real data set for testing the performance of K-means with real data. The simulated data set was used to generate a K-means dataset with a variety of conditions. The dataset size and accuracy was tested using an automated system designed to detect anomalies and analyze the impact of anomalies. This paper presents the experimental results for KDDU and simulated data to illustrate the utility of K-means and the performance of KDDU on synthetic data sets.

We consider a supervised learning problem in which the prediction model is a Bayesian model. We develop a novel technique for Bayesian stochastic prediction of the model without a prior priori knowledge about the predictions. Our technique is the equivalent to a deep reinforcement learning approach with a priori knowledge about the model. We study the problem in two ways: 1) We solve the problem by solving an approximation to the stochastic reward function; 2) We show empirically that the problem is NP-hard for the stochastic reward function, yielding a Bayesian algorithm. Our problem is one of estimating the posterior distribution of the Bayesian reward function over the observed data and thus is NP-hard. We prove that our algorithm is competitive in terms of performance without prior knowledge of the model. We demonstrate that our algorithm achieves significantly higher prediction accuracy than the priori-unseen reward function on $n$ datasets; with the same training set, the performance of the priori-unseen reward function is comparable to an efficient Bayesian reinforcement learning algorithm.

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On the Convergence of K-means Clustering

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  • An Automated Toebin Tree Extraction Technique

    Evaluation of the Performance of SVM in Discounted HCI-PCH Anomaly DetectionWe consider a supervised learning problem in which the prediction model is a Bayesian model. We develop a novel technique for Bayesian stochastic prediction of the model without a prior priori knowledge about the predictions. Our technique is the equivalent to a deep reinforcement learning approach with a priori knowledge about the model. We study the problem in two ways: 1) We solve the problem by solving an approximation to the stochastic reward function; 2) We show empirically that the problem is NP-hard for the stochastic reward function, yielding a Bayesian algorithm. Our problem is one of estimating the posterior distribution of the Bayesian reward function over the observed data and thus is NP-hard. We prove that our algorithm is competitive in terms of performance without prior knowledge of the model. We demonstrate that our algorithm achieves significantly higher prediction accuracy than the priori-unseen reward function on $n$ datasets; with the same training set, the performance of the priori-unseen reward function is comparable to an efficient Bayesian reinforcement learning algorithm.


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